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In Depth > Brazil

The Coup Plot That Seeks to Oust Brazil’s President

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff won re-election in 2014, a result her supporters say the opposition wants to overturn.

  • In Depth

    14 APRIL 2016

    Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff won re-election in 2014, a result her supporters say the opposition wants to overturn.

Opposition lawmakers are attempting to impeach Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, which her supporters claim is an effort to subvert democracy.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is confronting one of the biggest political battles of her lifetime: Impeachment.

The Brazilian president faces the very real possibility of being removed from office in what her supporters consider a blow against the country’s fragile democracy.

Rousseff’s mentor and predecessor Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva has described efforts to impeach the president as a “political coup.”

The president’s opponents are trying to tie her impeachment to an ongoing corruption scandal but the truth is the proceedings have nothing to do with corruption and Rousseff has not been found guilty of any crime.

Rousseff’s re-election marked the fourth consecutive victory for the Workers Party, a fact that did not sit well with the country’s right-wing politicians, who immediately started to conspire against the president.

That is why her supporters see the impeachment as an effort to retroactively win the 2014 election through non-democratic means.

If You Only Read One Thing…

5 Things You Really Need to Know About the Plot to Oust Brazil’s President Roussef

The president’s opponents are deliberately trying to tie her to the ongoing corruption investigation involving the state-run oil company, even though there’s no evidence to connect her to the scandal.In fact the impeachment process is completely unrelated to the corruption scandal. Here are five things you really need to know about the plot to oust President Rousseff. READ MORE

Why Brazil Matters

Why you should care that Brazil’s elites may be about to organize a coup.

Brazil is Latin America’s largest economy, a key player on the world stage, and home to over 200 million people, a coup there would have major ramifications throughout the region and beyond.

Find out more about Brazil’s people, economy, and political history. READ MORE

Race, Racism, and the Coup Against Dilma

Brazil: Race, Racism, and the Coup Attempt Against Rousseff

The protests backing the ouster of President Rousseff have been overwhelmingly white, revealing the racial divide of the current political crisis.

The coup-plotters have already indicated that should they get into power they will implement neoliberal shock therapy, with cuts to key social program.

In a country like Brazil, where race and class are nearly indistinguishable, the weight of their reactionary policies will fall heaviest on the country’s predominantly Black and low-income population. READ MORE

5 Ways Brazil’s Coup Plotters Plan Economic Shock Therapy

People are reflected on the glass as a board showing the Real-U.S. dollar and several foreign currencies exchange rates is seen in Rio de Janeiro

Much of the debate about whether or not Brazil’s elected president will be removed from office has focused on allegations of financial mismanagement and unproven allegations of corruption.

But many believe this is a smokescreen to oust a leftist government elected by 52 percent just two years ago and to force through an economic program that will return the economy to a more free-market, pro-business agenda… READ MORE

Hate Driven Coup: 5 Radical Policies That Irked Brazil’s Elite

An anti-government demonstrator and a supporter of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff (R) clash near the Planalto palace in Brasilia, Brazil, March 17, 2016.

President Rousseff’s re-election in 2014 marked the fourth consecutive victory for the Workers Party, a fact that did not sit well with the country’s elites and their right-wing allies, who immediately started to conspire against the president.

But what have the Workers Party (PT) governments done to provoke Brazil’s elites to the point that they are now willing to try to mount a coup to oust Rousseff? READ MORE

Brazilian Social Movements Promise to Resist Coup Efforts

Brazil's former President Lula da Silva (L) appears alongside João Pedro Stedile, a leading figure in the MST, during a rally in Brasilia, Brazil April 16, 2016.

In light of the efforts by Brazil’s political and economic elites to oust President Rousseff, social movements have pledged to resist what they call a coup plot.

There will be resistance and there will be a moment of social conflict,” said Guilherme Boulos, a leader within Brazil’s MTST homeless movement.

“If she loses and Temer takes over we will take to the streets, and we have the strength to stay there as long as necessary,” said Marco Antonio Baratto, coordinator of the MST landless peasants movement,

João Pedro Stedile, a leading figure in the MST, argued that the ouster of Rousseff would lead to an unpredictable outcome.

“If there is a coup, the political crisis will deepen, and there will be no way out in the short term;” wrote Stedile. READ MORE

Coup by the Numbers

The Role of Brazil’s Private Media

The Impeachment Process in Brazil

Brazil Impeachment

Achievements of the PT Governments

 

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